SHE HATES EMOTIONS Album “Melancholic Maniac”

The Eighties – a decade of artistic and musical freedom, heyday of New Wave and Dark Wave, the pioneering years of the movement that led into the dark music scene and movement. These were the times that shaped the artistic path of Chris Pohl (Blutengel). Now he wishes to pay tribute to his musical influences: She Hates Emotions. The album “Melancholic Maniac” will be out on May 15th!

With all the danceable and catchy tunes, the She Hates Emotions album title “Melancholic Maniac fits just perfectly: “The songs deal a lot with the fear of being abandoned or with loneliness in general, with love and death,” says Chris, who thus gives a lead to his devoted Blutengel fans.

The album “Melancholic Maniac (out May 15) is now available for preorder here https://www.outoflineshop.de/she-hates-emotions-melancholic-maniac-cd.html
or https://shehatesemotions.lnk.to/MelancholicManiac

Nevertheless: “Melancholic Maniac” is certainly not a Blutengel album, but it does transmit the prime times of bands like Depeche Mode, Anne Clark, Human League, Fad Gadget, Camouflage or Alphaville into the 21st century: She Hates Emotions.

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All New MKULTRASOUND PodCast Pete Guellard of MACE, Venus In Furs and Blitzkrieg and Cassie is back with Alex and Yvette

ALL NEW MKULTRASOUND PodCast we’re back with our first full blown show since early March with Yvette Lera AND the return of Cassie Balazic with interview, music and videos from Peter Guellard singer/songwriter: Blitzkrieg, guitarist: Venus In Furs and Mace and producer at Psychotribe

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Little Richard, Founding Father of Rock Who Broke Musical Barriers, Dead at 87

SOURCE: ROLLING STONE

Little Richard, a founding father of rock and roll whose fervent shrieks, flamboyant garb, and joyful, gender-bending persona embodied the spirit and sound of that new art form, died Saturday. He was 87. The musician’s son, Danny Jones Penniman, confirmed the pioneer’s death to Rolling Stone, adding that the cause of death was cancer.

Starting with “Tutti Frutti” in 1956, Little Richard cut a series of unstoppable hits – “Long Tall Sally” and “Rip It Up” that same year, “Lucille” in 1957, and “Good Golly Miss Molly” in 1958 – driven by his simple, pumping piano, gospel-influenced vocal exclamations and sexually charged (often gibberish) lyrics. “I heard Little Richard and Jerry Lee Lewis, and that was it,” Elton John told Rolling Stone in 1973. “I didn’t ever want to be anything else. I’m more of a Little Richard stylist than a Jerry Lee Lewis, I think. Jerry Lee is a very intricate piano player and very skillful, but Little Richard is more of a pounder.

Although he never hit the top 10 again after 1958, Little Richard’s influence was massive. The Beatles recorded several of his songs, including “Long Tall Sally,” and Paul McCartney’s singing on those tracks – and the Beatles’ own “I’m Down” – paid tribute to Little Richard’s shredded-throat style. His songs became part of the rock and roll canon, covered over the decades by everyone from the Everly Brothers, the Kinks, and Creedence Clearwater Revival to Elvis Costello and the Scorpions. “Elvis popularized [rock and roll],” Steven Van Zandt tweeted after the news broke. “Chuck Berry was the storyteller. Richard was the archetype.”

Little Richard’s stage persona – his pompadours, androgynous makeup and glass-bead shirts – also set the standard for rock and roll showmanship; Prince, to cite one obvious example, owed a sizable debt to the musician. “Prince is the Little Richard of his generation,” Richard told Joan Rivers in 1989 before looking at the camera and addressing Prince. “I was wearing purple before you was wearing it!”

Born Richard Wayne Penniman on December 5th, 1932, in Macon, Georgia, he was one of 12 children and grew up around uncles who were preachers. “I was born in the slums. My daddy sold whiskey, bootleg whiskey,” he told Rolling Stone in 1970. Although he sang in a nearby church, his father Bud wasn’t supportive of his son’s music and accused him of being gay, resulting in Penniman leaving home at 13 and moving in with a white family in Macon. But music stayed with him: One of his boyhood friends was Otis Redding, and Penniman heard R&B, blues and country while working at a concession stand at the Macon City Auditorium.

After performing at the Tick Tock Club in Macon and winning a local talent show, Penniman landed his first record deal, with RCA, in 1951. (He became “Little Richard” when he about 15 years old, when the R&B and blues worlds were filled with acts like Little Esther and Little Milton; he had also grown tired with people mispronouncing his last name as “Penny-man.”) He learned his distinctive piano style from Esquerita, a South Carolina singer and pianist who also wore his hair in a high black pompadour.

For the next five years, Little Richard’s career advanced only fitfully; fairly tame, conventional singles he cut for RCA and other labels didn’t chart. “When I first came along, I never heard any rock & roll,” he told Rolling Stone in 1990. “When I started singing [rock & roll], I sang it a long time before I presented it to the public because I was afraid they wouldn’t like it. I never heard nobody do it, and I was scared.”

By 1956, he was washing dishes at the Greyhound bus station in Macon (a job he had first taken a few years earlier after his father was murdered and Little Richard had to support his family). By then, only one track he’d cut, “Little Richard’s Boogie,” hinted at the musical tornado to come. “I put that little thing in it,” he told Rolling Stone in 1970 of the way he tweaked with his gospel roots. “I always did have that thing, but I didn’t know what to do with the thing I had.”

During this low point, he sent a tape with a rough version of a bawdy novelty song called “Tutti Frutti” to Specialty Records in Chicago. He came up with the song’s famed chorus — “a wop bob alu bob a wop bam boom” — while bored washing dishes. (He also cowrote “Long Tall Sally” while working that same job.) 

By coincidence, label owner and producer Art Rupe was in search of a lead singer for some tracks he wanted to cut in New Orleans, and Penniman’s howling delivery fit the bill. In September 1955, the musician cut a lyrically cleaned-up version of “Tutti Frutti,” which became his first hit, peaking at 17 on the pop chart. “’Tutti Frutti really started the races being together,” he told Rolling Stone in 1990. “From the git-go, my music was accepted by whites.”

Its followup, “Long Tall Sally,” hit Number Six, becoming his the highest-placing hit of his career. For just over a year, the musician released one relentless and arresting smash after another. From “Long Tall Sally” to “Slippin’ and Slidin,’” Little Richard’s hits – a glorious mix of boogie, gospel, and jump blues, produced by Robert “Bumps” Blackwell — sounded like he never stood still. With his trademark pompadour and makeup (which he once said he started wearing so that he would be less “threatening” while playing white clubs), he was instantly on the level of Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis and other early rock icons, complete with rabid fans and mobbed concerts. “That’s what the kids in America were excited about,” he told Rolling Stone in 1970. “They don’t want the falsehood — they want the truth.”

As with Presley, Lewis and other contemporaries, Penniman also was cast in early rock and roll movies like Don’t Knock the Rock (1956) and The Girl Can’t Help It (1957). In a sign of how segregated the music business and radio were at the time, though, Pat Boone’s milquetoast covers of “Tutti Frutti” and “Long Tall Sally,” both also released in 1956, charted as well if not higher than Richard’s own versions. (“Boone’s “Tutti Frutti” hit Number 12, surpassing Little Richard’s by nine slots.) Penniman later told Rolling Stone that he made sure to sing “Long Tall Sally” faster than “Tutti Frutti” so that Boone couldn’t copy him as much.


But then the hits stopped, by his own choice. After what he interpreted as signs – a plane engine that seemed to be on fire and a dream about the end of the world and his own damnation – Penniman gave up music in 1957 and began attending the Alabama Bible school Oakwood College, where he was eventually ordained a minister. When he finally cut another album, in 1959, the result was a gospel set called God Is Real.

His gospel music career floundering, Little Richard returned to secular rock in 1964. Although none of the albums and singles he cut over the next decade for a variety of labels sold well, he was welcomed back by a new generation of rockers like the Rolling Stones and Bob Dylan (who used to play Little Richard songs on the piano when he was a kid). When Little Richard played the Star-Club in Hamburg in the early Sixties, the opening act was none other than the Beatles. “We used to stand backstage at Hamburg’s Star-Club and watch Little Richard play,” John Lennon said later. “He used to read from the Bible backstage and just to hear him talk we’d sit around and listen. I still love him and he’s one of the greatest.”

By the 1970s, Little Richard was making a respectable living on the rock oldies circuit, immortalized in a searing, sweaty performance in the 1973 documentary Let the Good Times Roll. During this time, he also became addicted to marijuana and cocaine while, at the same time, returning to his gospel roots. 

Little Richard also dismantled sexual stereotypes in rock & roll, even if he confused many of his fans along the way. During his teen years and into his early rock stardom, his stereotypical flamboyant personality made some speculate about his sexuality, even if he never publicly came out. But that flamboyance didn’t derail his career. In the 1984 biography The Life and Times of Little Richard (written with his cooperation), he denounced homosexuality as “contagious … It’s not something you’re born with.” (Eleven years later, he said in an interview with Penthouse that he had been “gay all my life.”)

Later in life, he described himself as “omnisexual,” attracted to both men and women. But during an interview with the Christian-tied Three Angels Broadcasting Group in 2017, he suddenly denounced gay and trans lifestyles: “God, Jesus, He made men, men, he made women, women, you know? And you’ve got to live the way God wants you to live. So much unnatural affection. So much of people just doing everything and don’t think about God.”

Yet none of that seemed to damage his mystique or legend. In the 1980s, he appeared in movies like Down and Out in Beverly Hills and in TV shows like Full House and Miami Vice. In 1986, he was one of the 10 original inductees into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and in 1993, he was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Grammys. His last known recording was in 2010, when he cut a song for a tribute album to gospel singer Dottie Rambo.

In the years before his death, Little Richard, who was by then based in Nashville, still performed periodically. Onstage, though, the physicality of old was gone: Thanks to hip replacement surgery in 2009, he could only perform sitting down at his piano. But his rock and roll spirit never left him. “I’m sorry I can’t do it like it’s supposed to be done,” he told one audience in 2012. After the audience screamed back in encouragement, he said – with a very Little Richard squeal — “Oh, you gonna make me scream like a white girl!”

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PUSCIFER RETURNS WITH TIMELY “APOCALYPTICAL” VIDEO/MAYNARD JAMES KEENAN-FRONTED BAND RELEASE FIRST NEW MUSIC SINCE 2015/SINGLE ARRIVES VIA NEWLY FORMED ALCHEMY RECORDINGS

May 8, 2020 – Jerome, Ariz. – Puscifer, the Arizona-born, “exceptionally groovy” (Entertainment Weekly) band that Revolver dubbed “Maynard James Keenan’s… indescribable musical/performance-art collective,” release the eerily topical “Apocalyptical” single and video (https://Puscifer.lnk.to/ApocalypticalPR).

A message from Keenan arrives alongside the track: “Manipulated information disseminated by kings, queens, dictators, so called leaders, supposed professionals or outliers and conspiracy theorists living underground, or in basements, is not new or unique to this generation. Misdirection is Power Struggles’ conjoined twin but the speed at which it now travels in this digital age is dangerous and destructive on many levels. This rapid distribution of poison and its immediate impact will be the hallmark of our generation. Even In light of all this, and all the noise the digital landscape generates, all I keep asking myself is ‘what is it with the whole hoarding toilet paper thing?’”

The ”Apocalyptical” release follows social media breadcrumbs hinting at imminent moves amongst the Puscifer camp. As had been speculated, and can now be confirmed, the band’s fourth full-length studio album will arrive this Fall via Alchemy Recordings, a partnership with BMG. Alchemy Recordings is a new record label created in partnership between Dino Paredes, former American Recordings Vice President of A&R, and Danny Wimmer, the founder of Danny Wimmer Presents, the premier production company for rock music festivals in the United States.

Vocalist Carina Round sheds light on the darkly prophetic timing of the song: “’Apocalyptical’ was one of the very first musical ideas for the new record that we put our voices on out in Arizona in late 2019. It was simultaneously very fresh and also felt like we had never been apart.”

“For the initial writing process of ‘Apocalyptical,” we relied heavily on a Fairlight IIx (an early musical computer using 8 bit samples), and a Synclavier II (another early digital workstation that relied on FM synthesis),” explains guitar player and co-producer Mat Mitchell of the behind-the-scenes creation of the song. “These were heavyweights in early digital music productions and defined a generation of music. We decided to set modern computers aside by working within the limitations of these early computer technologies. This created a unique space for us to explore and the results can be heard throughout this track.”

Puscifer has released three full-length studio albums: “V” is for Vagina (2007), Conditions of My Parole (2011) and Money Shot (2015). Maynard James Keenan initially used the moniker in a 1995 episode of “Mr. Show,” bringing the band to life in 2007. Keenan’s companions in the electro-rock outfit have been Mat Mitchell (guitar/production) and Carina Round (vocals/songwriting). The band brings a unique mix of recorded output and on-stage theatrics, pairing each release with a conceptual live show, from a “Hee Haw”-infused performance featuring recurring Puscifer characters Billy Dee and Hildy to 2017’s luchadores-themed outing.

Puscifer.com

Facebook.com/PusciferMusic

Twitter.com/Puscifer

Instagram.com/Puscifer

Alchemyrecordings.com

Facebook.com/AlchemyRecordings

Twitter.com/Alchemyrecords

Instagram.com/Alchemyrecordings


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“THE 8TH OF MAY, THE 8TH OF MAY” CELEBRATE THE LOUDEST DAY OF THE YEAR MOTÖRHEAD DAY!

“Ace Of Spades” – the title track of MOTÖRHEAD‘s 1980 iconic, game changing album isn’t just one of the greatest hard rock songs ever written – it has truly become a lifestyle anthem for several generations of rockers, metalheads, punks, bikers, athletes, rebels, outcasts, and freethinkers all around the world. Few songs in modern history can instantly ignite the adrenaline of music fans the way the song’s opening dirty bass riff, and drum roll can. From zero to 100 mph in a matter of seconds. That speaker-destroying opening riff is unstoppable. And the song changed the course of hard rock…forever.    Now, 40 years later we are celebrating this milestone album’s anniversary on MOTÖRHEAD DAY 2020, ‘The 8th Of May’ by inviting you, the fans from around the globe to join us on this special day where everything is louder than everything else! Here’s what’s happening today, The 8th of May

  • Warpig your face with a unique Facebook and Instagram filter of the snarling embodiment of MOTÖRHEAD.
  • A worldwide premiere of a new lyric video for the most iconic of MOTÖRHEAD songs – “Ace Of Spades.”
  • A limited edition Road Crew merchandise capsule is released on the webstore –https://gtly.to/4TxQu50Ad. A portion of the proceeds of the Road Crew merchandise will be going to Live Nation’s Crew Nation Fund to provide financial support to touring crews affected at this time. #WeAreTheRoadCrew
  • Raise a toast to MOTÖRHEAD! Fill a glass with your favorite libation and post your toast to MOTÖRHEAD online with the hashtag #8thofmay. Jack and Coke optional!

 We’d hope you can join us as part of this celebration of all things MOTÖRHEAD. Lockdown may be going on all around us but the world is ours and we were born to raise hell! We look forward to celebrating 40 years of lawn killing, bastard Rock n Roll with you all!

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RAMMSTEIN Officially Cancels 2020 European Stadium Tour

German industrial metallers RAMMSTEIN have canceled their 2020 European stadium tour. The trek was due to kick off on May 25 in Klagenfurt, Austria and conclude on August 4 in Aarhus. Denmark.

Earlier today, RAMMSTEIN released the following statement: “Due to local event restrictions related to COVID-19, which now affect almost all planned dates, the band’s 2020 stadium tour can unfortunately not take place.

“We are currently checking whether it is possible to reschedule the dates and will communicate any updates as soon as possible!

“All tickets will remain valid until then.

“Thank you again for your understanding and patience.”

RAMMSTEIN has not yet officially called off its U.S. tour, which is scheduled to run from August 20 through September 27.

RAMMSTEIN‘s seventh, untitled album came out in May 2019 via UME/Spinefarm in Europe and Caroline Records in the U.S. The band’s first studio disc since 2009’s “Liebe Ist Für Alle Da” was produced by Olsen Involtini with RAMMSTEIN and was mixed at a Santa Monica, California studio with Rich Costey, an American producer who has previously worked with MUSERAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE and FRANZ FERDINAND, among others.

RAMMSTEIN guitarist Richard Kruspe told Metal Wani about the making of the band’s new album: “Well, when I thought to do another RAMMSTEIN record, I was like, ‘No, I’m going to do that. I’m not going through more suffering.’ That was four years ago. But what we did in the beginning is we said ‘Let’s get together and try to come up with three or four songs.’ We didn’t really put any pressure on us, which was very important at this time. While we were starting to rehearse and stuff and getting ideas, I thought, ‘Wow, it’s actually very good. Things have changed.’ All of a sudden, there’s a certain kind of respect that I always missed a little bit. We just had good chemistry, which reminded me of the first time when we started. Then I felt, like, ‘What would interest me on a new RAMMSTEIN record?’ I thought, ‘Every time people talk RAMMSTEIN, it’s about fire. It’s all about the show.’ Nobody talks about the music anymore for RAMMSTEIN, and it kind of bothered me. I was thinking, ‘I want to do another record. It has to be musical in a way that can really stand out from other records.’ That was my goal, or our goal.”

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